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Canadian Public Health Association

In the news


2017

Critics see fishy timing in Liberal plan to make top health officer 'independent'

October 19, 2017

"It's somewhat of an empty victory for the health of New Brunswickers," said Ian Culbert, the executive director of the Canadian Public Health Association, which has objected to the reorganization. "You're giving an officer of the legislature some responsibility, but they have no authority and no resources. So it's really creating an empty office at the end of the day."

Top health bureaucrat calls overhaul of public health a 'straight resource issue'

October 13, 2017

In August, the province announced it was "enhancing" the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health by transferring several functions to other departments. The association's executive director, Ian Culbert, told CBC News that "it just doesn't make sense to us to break up a public health team." "We have serious concerns about what could happen to normal services for public health activities in the province, but also what could happen if there was an emergency."

National public health group has 'serious concerns' about N.B. restructuring

October 13, 2017

A national public health organization says changes the New Brunswick government made to the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health don't make sense. The Canadian Public Health Association published an open letter to Health Minister Benoît Bourque outlining its concerns. "We are concerned that the announced changes to the organization of the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health may result in a reduction in the level and efficiency of services provided to the citizens of New Brunswick," says the letter published on the association's website.

Changes to the Chief Medical Health Office in New Brunswick

October 13, 2017

Terry Seguin talks to the executive director of the Canadian Public Health Assoc. It's letting the NB government know it isn't a fan of changes to the office of the chief medical officer of health.

Public health restructuring in New Brunswick

October 13, 2017

The executive director of the Canadian Public Health Association says restructuring the office of the chief medical officer of health in New Brunswick is a mistake.

Gun violence isn’t just a U.S. problem—and Canada isn’t immune

October 7, 2017

Halifax Regional Police, meanwhile, created an in-house research coordinator to study gun violence after the city experienced a particularly violent 2016. In June, the Canadian Public Health Association hosted a conference in the city in hopes of employing a public health approach to end gun crime.

Pot-infused cuisine will be the next big trend, food expert predicts

September 26, 2017

Ian Culbert, executive director of the Canadian Public Health Association, said there must be strict regulation and a limited range of products available initially. Edibles must have clear identification of dosage and servings, and come with education about how it takes longer to take effect than smoking.

Decriminalize all drug possession? Not a bad idea: Editorial

September 15, 2017

The United Nations, the World Health Organization, the International Red Cross, the Canadian Public Health Association, the medical health officers of British Columbia, Vancouver, Toronto, not to mention many front-line health workers – they all agree: treating drug users like criminals is a costly, dangerous mistake. And as Canada’s epidemic of opioid overdoses deepens, this chorus is growing louder and more urgent. It’s time Ottawa listened.

Feds consider Manitoba's codeine restrictions

September 15, 2017

Health Canada is pondering whether to emulate Manitoba pharmacists’ move last year to restrict access to codeine products, though there is no proof the policy has helped or hindered the opioid crisis. "We have to be careful when we make these sweeping policy changes, to think through the unintended, negative consequences," said Ian Culbert, executive director of the Canadian Public Health Association. "These kinds of changes might seem intelligent from a bureaucrat’s desk in Ottawa, but when you’re hitting the ground… in downtown Winnipeg, the impact can be quite negative."

Ottawa pourrait forcer la culture de « superplants »

September 14, 2017

Le gouvernement Trudeau a par ailleurs eu droit à l’appui d’un allié étonnant, au Comité parlementaire de la santé mercredi. L’Association canadienne de la santé publique et la Société canadienne de pédiatrie ont toutes deux martelé qu’il était urgent de légaliser la marijuana car les Canadiens, et surtout les jeunes, en consomment déjà à l’heure actuelle. Autant encadrer leur consommation dès maintenant pour pouvoir en étudier les causes et lancer des campagnes de sensibilisation, a fait valoir le directeur général de l’ACSP, Ian Culbert.