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Canadian Public Health Association

Programme de Santé publique 2019

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Du 30 avril au 2 mai, Centre Shaw, Ottawa (ON)

Les séances seront présentées dans la langue de leur titre. 

Cette section pourrait faire l’objet de modifications.

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séances préparatoires

Les 28 et 29 avril     Les Médecins de santé publique du Canada

Assemblée générale annuelle

Le dimanche 28 avril     8 h à 9 h

Join us at the AGM to hear highlights of what PHPC accomplished in the past year and help set the direction in the years moving forward.

PHPC CPD SYMPOSIUMs

Le dimache 28 avril et lundi 29 avril     8 h à 17 h 30

These sessions will engage public health and preventive medicine specialists and other physicians working in public health in sharing, responding to and discussing key public health issues. This two day symposium will include a series of high quality talks by public health physician leaders from across Canada and dedicated sessions focusing on the federal role in local public health. The role of PHPM specialists, and contexts in which they practice, will be emphasized throughout.

Des frais d’inscription supplémentaires sont exigés :

  • Résidents : 150 $
  • Médecins : 200 $

Inscrivez-vous pour les deux journées et sauver :

  • les 28 et 29 avril - Résidents : 200 $
  • les 28 et 29 avril - Médecins : 300 $

    PHPC ANNUAL SOCIETY DINNER

    19 h à 22 h

    Join the networking dinner for public health and preventive medicine specialists and other physicians working in public health.

    Des frais d’inscription supplémentaires sont exigés :

    • Résident : 85 $
    • Médecins : 100 $

    Inscription des séances préparatoires de MSPC

    Le 29 avril     Alliance canadienne de surveillance régionale des facteurs de risque

    INTERCONNECTION AND DATA LINKAGE – THE ART AND SCIENCE OF COMBINING DATA

    Le lundi 29 avril    13 h à 18 h

    Des frais d’inscription supplémentaires sont exigés : 25 $

    Data is the key to health surveillance – and many fields in fact. But what happens when you don’t have it all? When key pieces of the data puzzle are missing? When the data you need isn't all in one place?

    This year’s pre-conference symposium by CARRFS focuses on Interconnection and Data Linkage. We delve into the state of the art in linking and combining data from various sources. What are the benefits of combining data for our work in public health and surveillance? When can we link datasets? How do we combine multiple, disparate sources of data? We live in a data rich world. It’s time for health surveillance and other health professionals to fully take advantage of this to maximize the potential of existing data to improve the health and well-being of Canadians. Building on successful initiatives combining and linking data, this symposium presents new strategies and discusses the challenges and opportunities to link and combine data from across Canada.

    présenté par : Alliance canadienne de surveillance régionale des facteurs de risque (ACSRFR)

    Inscription du séance préparatoire de ACSRFR

    Le 29 avril     Santé Canada

    le lundi 29 avril     13 h à 16 h

    Health Canada’s Air Quality Program is soliciting input on how to better support public health policy from the regulatory and research perspectives.  We welcome you to join us and learn about the exciting air quality work – research, guidelines, and interventions - Health Canada is undertaking to protect the health of Canadians.  More importantly, we invite you to HAVE YOUR SAY!  Topics will include: indoor air quality; the intersection between exposure research and public health; the latest on radon; and traffic pollution.  
     

    Inscription du séance préparatoire de Santé Canada

    mardi 30 avril

    08 h 30 à 10 h 30     Plénière I

    VOIX D’INCLUSION

    L’interprétation simultanée sera disponible pour cette séance.

    La principale autorité en santé publique du Canada ‒ l’administratrice en chef de la santé publique Dre Theresa Tam ‒ et le directeur du Service de santé publique des États-Unis ‒ le vice-amiral Jerome M. Adams ‒ animeront ensemble une séance plénière où il sera question des vecteurs de la stigmatisation et de la discrimination, de mesures concrètes pour favoriser l’évolution des systèmes et des moyens de motiver les gens à devenir des catalyseurs d’action dans leurs sphères d’influence.        

    Une présentation par le Dr Adams sera suivie d’une discussion libre animée sur des thèmes transversaux de la santé publique, comme la santé mentale et la consommation de substances. Lors d’une période de questions, les délégués auront la possibilité d’approfondir ces thèmes et d’apprendre auprès des administrateurs en chef de la santé publique des deux pays comment changer les choses et dépasser l’inertie du système face à la stigmatisation et à la discrimination.

    Orateur et oratrice:

    • Surgeon General Vice-Amiral Jerome M. Adams
    • Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer, Public Health Agency of Canada

    10 h à 10 h 45     Pause-rafraîchissement avec exposants

    10 h 45 à 12 h 15     Séances simultanées

    Future-Proofing Public Health in Canada: a fireside chat with four public health agency heads

    présenté par : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada

    The CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health is bringing together the leaders of Canada’s four national and provincial public health agencies for a fireside chat to discuss the key challenges and opportunities that we will face in the next 10 years and discuss strategies to future-proof public health.
    This informal discussion will touch on emerging topic areas of public health importance and areas where we anticipate future challenges, which will include topic suggestions from the audience. Examples of topics for discussion include: 

    • Researchers and decision-makers have access to ever-increasing amounts of data. There is an increasing demand for new ‘smart’ technologies and an increased interest in using artificial intelligence (AI) approaches to inform planning and decision-making, especially in an era of ‘precision health’. What are the implications of these trends for public health and health equity? How should public health engage in these issues?
    • The world is becoming increasingly urbanized; population demographics are shifting towards older populations; we are increasingly impacted by disruptors to our environment such as climate change. What is public health’s role in promoting and supporting healthy, resilient and sustainable cities?

    This session will stimulate a lively discussion forecasting future challenges and opportunities for public health based on current and emerging societal trends. Discussants and the audience will be encouraged to think proactively to anticipate challenges and opportunities that may arise in the next 10 years, and about how public health can position itself as a leader in ensuring future generations are able to achieve a healthy, inclusive, and sustainable future.

    POLICY FORUM

    présenté par : Association canadienne de santé publique

    The Policy Forum is an opportunity for participants to have direct influence on CPHA’s policy initiatives. During this session, participants will be asked to provide comments on proposals currently under development. The results of the discussions will be used to adjust the proposals to better reflect participants’ concerns before review and approval by CPHA’s Board. Those who attend will receive written summaries of these subjects prior to Public Health 2019. The session will wrap up with a Rapid-Fire Policy Round, where participants will be given 30 seconds each to present one issue of particular interest to them.

    PROMOTING HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS FOR YOUTH THROUGH COMPREHENSIVE SEXUALITY EDUCATION: WHAT DOES THE EVIDENCE TELL US?

    présenté par : Association canadienne de santé publique

    Previous research has found that sexual health education is delivered inconsistently across Canada, with significant variation in the amount and mode of instruction as well as the topics covered. Generally, youth report a desire to learn more about healthy relationships and sexual pleasure, topics often unaddressed through school curricula. Although preliminary evidence and theory suggest that addressing these topics through sexuality education programs could contribute to dating violence prevention (DVP) amongst youth, current evaluations are limited with respect to measurement of DVP-related outcomes.

    This presentation will outline themes from the literature and interviews with experts in the field, and highlight the primary issues faced by Canadian youth as well as the need for a youth-informed approach to DVP. Through facilitated discussion, participants will be invited to reflect and share their thoughts on possible strategies to overcome some of the current barriers related to the implementation and evaluation of DVP programming in Canada.

    PRÉSENTATIONS DE RÉSUMÉS ORAUX

    Les détails suivront.

    12 h 15 à 13 h     Déjeuner contact

    13 h à 14 h     Présentations d'affiches - séance 1

    La séance spéciale d’affiches et de réseautage permettra aux présentateurs d’engager la conversation avec les délégués et de présenter dans un lieu plus dynamique. Moins structurée qu’un exposé oral et avec plus de temps de présentation, la séance d’affiches permettra aux délégués de créer des liens et d’échanger des idées novatrices tout en facilitant des discussions et des commentaires productifs.

    Les détails de présentations suivra.

    14 h à 15 h 30     Séances simultanées

    Cultural Safety Training and Anti-Racism Education within MPH Programs

    présenté par : Network of Schools and Programs of Population and Public Health

    This session will build on the work of the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH) to bring an Indigenous perspective to the core competencies for public health. The focus will be on exploring approaches to prioritize Indigenous teachings, and anti-racism and cultural safety practice within a decolonizing framework for graduate public health education transformation. The session will include a panel presentation from three MPH programs; the panellists will share emerging insights and challenges faced in integrating educational initiatives in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #24. Symposium participants will then work in small groups to develop competency statements to help guide MPH training initatives in this area.

    PLAY IN THE CITY – A PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVE

    présenté par : Association canadienne de santé publique

    CPHA, with the generous support of the Lawson Foundation, has recently released a policy toolkit to support increased access to child-led unstructured play in Canada, as well as a supporting CPHA position statement. These documents provide generic tools to support improved access, but there is a need to identify approaches to operationalize this vision within rural and urban communities.  

    Through a combination of presentations and facilitated discussion, those attending will have the opportunity to consider how selected communities have improved access to children’s play and discuss how attendees could support such initiatives within their communities.

    IMPROVING PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY IN CANADA

    présenté par : Médecins de santé publique du Canada

    Across the country, health system reforms, budget constraints and changes in system priorities have been impacting public health to varying degrees over the past 10 years. As a follow-up to last year’s session, which asked the question of how to best collect data to measure the success of public health systems, the Urban Public Health Network (UPHN) has been working with health system researchers to better understand and quantify these impacts on public health capacity, including changes in governance, structure, programs and staffing/funding levels. Preliminary results from a survey of UPHN member cities across Canada will be shared alongside perspectives from rural and remote jurisdictions and across Canada more broadly. Through large and small group structured discussion we will explore actions that can be taken to advocate for a strengthening of public health capacity for the future.

    PRÉSENTATIONS DE RÉSUMÉS ORAUX

    Les détails suivront.

    15 h 30 à 15 h 45     Pause-rafraîchissement

    15 h 45 à 17 h 15     Séances simultanées

    APPROACHES TO EVALUATE COORDINATED COMMUNITY PLANS AND INITIATIVES TO PREVENT AND REDUCE OPIOID-RELATED HARMS IN CANADA

    Multi-strategy community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms have been emerging in Canada, yet the effectiveness of such an approach is not yet understood. Findings from a recent scoping review on community plans identified a lack of evaluated responses to inform public health practice.  Further, consulted stakeholders identified the need to improve evaluation efforts despite challenges associated with capacity. This 90-minute workshop will focus on building evaluation capacity of public health professionals to develop evaluation activities related to coordinated community opioid-related plans. 

    Participants will be engaged in discussion on the current state of evaluation findings on community responses to address opioid-related harms, the application of the Municipal Drug Strategy Coordinators Network of Ontario (MDSCNO) Evaluation Framework, and the opportunity to increase evaluation activities in their ongoing work related to opioids. Learnings from the workshop can inform evaluation planning for public health initiatives addressing opioids. 

    BASIC INCOME: AN IDEA WHOSE TIME HAS COME? AN INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO BUILD PUBLIC HEALTH CAPACITY

    This workshop will convene a public health discussion on basic income. Facilitators will provide an overview of evidence on basic income; then, through facilitated discussion, they will focus on the role of public health practitioners, and the potential policy levers at different orders of government (local, provincial, and federal) that could be used to move basic income ideas and the evidence base forward in Canada. We welcome participants who have been involved in basic income research and advocacy in their jurisdictions, as well as those who are new to the topic and interested in learning more. Following this workshop, delegates will be able to facilitate a conversation on basic income-related actions in their own jurisdictions.

    BUILDING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY FOR HEALTH EQUITY ACTION

    Organizational capacity for health equity, the ability of an organization to identify existing health inequities and act to reduce them, is a key area of investment for public health organizations. In pursuit of health equity, organizations must assess and build their organizational capacity to engage in deep and sustained action. The National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health is implementing a participatory initiative (evidence synthesis, learning circle, direct support to public health organizations) to identify frameworks, strategies and organizational conditions that support organizational capacity for health equity action.  

    Speakers will share perspectives on how the initiative is achieving the anticipated outcomes to support public health organizations to identify components of organizational capacity needed to enable health equity action and shift their practice. Participants will learn about domains of organizational health equity capacity and a multi-level approach to organizational change. Delegates will be introduced to the experiences of public health organizations developing organizational-level change activities to support action to improve health equity. 

    CAIRE AND PIPER: LEADING RESEARCH ON THE SCIENCE, SAFETY, EFFECTIVENESS AND FEASIBILITY OF IMMUNIZATION IN PREGNANCY IN CANADA

    Immunization in pregnancy is routinely recommended in Canada to protect against influenza and pertussis. However, coverage is not high. This is due in part to hesitancy about vaccination and in part to lack of streamlined delivery systems during pregnancy care. This symposium will present Canadian research on the science of vaccine safety and effectiveness in pregnancy, explore the feasibility issues related to immunization in pregnancy, and enable discussion of potential solutions to improving uptake of immunization in pregnancy. 

    Participants will leave the session better informed about the strong evidence base that supports the safety of immunization in pregnancy. They will have contributed to an active discussion on addressing hesitancy and feasibility issues in providing immunization during pregnancy. The information can be used by participants to strengthen the quality of advice, support championing of immunization in pregnancy, and increase access to immunization.

    DEFINING THRESHOLDS FOR INDOOR TEMPERATURES AS A PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE

    Most heat-related fatalities occur in an indoor setting, with exposure to high indoor temperatures forming an underlying cause of many heat-related fatalities during extreme heat events. Climate change is expected to increase the frequency, severity and duration of extreme events, yet currently there is no guidance on maximum indoor temperature that could be considered a threshold to inform prevention strategies or heat protection measures. 

    This session aims to introduce the need for the identification of maximum indoor temperature thresholds in support of effective health adaptation to heat in the context of the changing climate. Participants will be introduced to a complex public health issue, the directions that have been taken, and considerations being analyzed to inform future action. This session offers participants an opportunity to participate in the policy analysis process and influence future public health activities by speaking to vulnerabilities, considerations, and opportunities for collaboration.

    ESTABLISHING FIRST NATIONS POPULATION HEALTH AND WELLNESS INDICATORS FOR THE NEXT 10 YEARS

    The Office of the Provincial Health Officer (PHO) of British Columbia (BC) and the Office of the Chief Medical Officer (OCMO) of the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) have develop a renewed set of 15 indicators to help advance First Nations Population Health and Wellness in the Province of BC by setting an agenda for the next 10 years (2019 to 2029). This symposium will focus on a case example of how BC is transforming population health reporting on First Nations at a provincial level. By privileging Indigenous worldviews and knowledge, and expanding current population and public health discourse, the new indicators move away from a sickness- and deficit-based view of health to a more holistic and strengths-based perspective on health. 

    This session will share how a Two-Eyed Seeing approach was used to develop the indicators. Participants can expect to learn about the First Nations Perspective on Health and Wellness and how such a framework can be applied in their public health reporting, research, or community initiatives. 

    Knowledge translation strategies for action – Let’s talk about the future of public health surveillance!

    présenté par : Alliance canadienne de surveillance régionale des facteurs de risque

    A cornerstone of public health surveillance is getting the right information to the right people in a timely fashion for them to act and change for the better.

    This session focuses on knowledge translation strategies for action. First, we explore the foundations of knowledge transfer asking “Why we need knowledge transfer and what are the basic principles of knowledge transfer?” and “Is there a gap between science and policy?” Then we will delve deeper into the last 8 of the 12 steps for successfully translating knowledge to action, examining public health successes including health proverbs, chronic disease clock, making information accessible and readable, motivating and rewarding users. Then it will be time to look to the future. The upcoming impacts of new computer technologies, improved statistical analyses, data visualizations, improved information dissemination, and information technology are scrutinized. Also, what new networks of professionals are evolving and how clinicians and public health professionals are beginning to interact in an emerging field of “Clinical Public Health” are examined.

    LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LARGE COLLABORATIVE GROUP

    Strong collaborations and partnerships are essential in public health to address emerging issues and promote optimal implementation of best practices. This panel session will focus on experiences, challenges, and advantages of collaboration. Panelists are members of a current Public Health Ontario Locally Driven Collaborative Project (LDCP), including, Public Health Unit staff and an academic partner from Brock University. Panelists will discuss approaches (i.e., Integrated Knowledge Translation) and tools (i.e. partnership surveys) adopted to enhance their partnership and collaboration, including results of partnership evaluations that were conducted in 2016 and 2018. 

    Results of this evaluation will be shared to show areas that required focused attention, and the panel will discuss how the results were used to strengthen the team’s partnership. Through an interactive Q&A, participants will learn about different tools and approaches that foster effective collaboration with this LDCP and how these may be successfully adopted in their own partnerships.

    MIGRATION AND HEALTH: GLOBAL JOURNEYS THROUGH POLICY AND PRACTICE

    This workshop will facilitate the exploration of the global, regional, national and local contexts that shape the everyday experiences of health and health care of migrating people and families. We will briefly share some key issues, and then will share the results of research through role-play case exercises. Participants will run through a simulated experience of the journey and settlement of migrating families as they navigate systems and policies. Through role-play exercises, workshop participants will learn how to assess the health equity impact of policy and practice through reflection on their experiences in the role play that expose health consequences experienced along the journey of migration and settlement. 

    After the role-play exercise, participants will be divided into teams to develop a group health equity impact assessment of one of the policy/practice examples from the role play. The groups will then present their analysis to inform a collective story of how health equity is compromised in the migration journey. Lastly, the group will recommend policy and practice changes that align with principles of equity.

    Public Health and Climate Change: From Evidence to Action 

    présenté par : Ontario Public Health Association

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified climate change as the defining issue for public health in the 21st  century.  Scientific evidence on the health impacts of climate change has been mounting over the last year, along with media and public attention. Hear from experts about the latest evidence on health impacts–in particular the health equity implications for individuals and communities–as well as actions being planned and underway at the national level. Learn from practitioners about leading public health practices in local mitigation and adaptation. The Ontario Public Health Association will share its learnings from the development of a provincial health-related climate communications campaign. This session will provide delegates with an opportunity to discuss how public health professionals can promote collaboration with others to build greater awareness about climate change-related health risks as well as actions that can be taken to improve population health.  

    mercredi 1 mai

    7 h à 8 h 30     Assemblée générale annuelle de l'ACSP

    L’assemblée générale annuelle de l’ACSP est ouverte à tous les participants, mais il faut s’inscrire à l’avance. Seuls les membres en règle peuvent voter à l’AGA. Les participants dont l’adhésion a expiré et les nouveaux membres doivent être en règle d’ici le mardi 30 avril à midi pour pouvoir voter.
    Le petit déjeuner sera servi.

    8 h 30 à 10 h     Plénière II

    POUR INTÉGRER LE SAVOIR ET LES VALEURS AUTOCHTONES DANS LES PROGRAMMES DE SANTÉ PUBLIQUE ÉTABLIS

    L’interprétation simultanée sera disponible pour cette séance.

    La Commission de vérité et réconciliation (CVR) a souligné l’importance de l’autodétermination pour les Autochtones. La communauté de la santé publique doit revoir la gestion des soins thérapeutiques avec humilité et respect pour la culture autochtone si elle espère atteindre les objectifs d’équité en santé. Pour les peuples des Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis du Canada, la tuberculose est ancrée dans la colonisation et la violence structurelle persistante. 

    Dans le contexte des Appels à l’action de la CVR, de la Déclaration politique sur la lutte contre la tuberculose et de l’objectif de développement durable qui consiste à mettre fin à la tuberculose, les délégués seront informés des efforts en cours pour éradiquer la tuberculose. Les leçons de ces initiatives pourront ensuite guider une démarche d’équité en santé axée sur les déterminants sociaux et écologiques de la santé et l’incorporation du savoir et des normes culturelles autochtones dans la mise en œuvre des programmes. Cette séance se rapporte à un vaste éventail de sujets et de milieux. 
     

    Oratrices et orateurs :

    • Denise (Isa) Wolf, Communicable Disease Control Nurse Specialist, FNHA TB Services
    • Natan Obed, President, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami
    • Marg Friesen,  Minister of Health of Métis Nation Saskatchewan

    10 h à 10 h 45     Pause-rafraîchissement avec exposants 

    10 h 45 à 12 h 15     Séances simultanées

    SYMPOSIUM DE DAVID BUTLER JONES ET DE L’ADMINISTRATRICE EN CHEF DE LA SANTÉ PUBLIQUE – DÉTERMINANTS SOCIAUX ET CULTURELS DE L’USAGE DES ANTIBIOTIQUES

    présenté par : Agence de la santé publique du Canada

    L’interprétation simultanée sera disponible pour cette séance.

    La résistance aux antimicrobiens est l’un des nouveaux défis de santé publique du 21e siècle au Canada et à l’échelle internationale. Devant la menace de perdre les solutions de traitement d’infections courantes, une approche systémique est nécessaire en vue de préserver l’efficacité des antibiotiques. Cette approche consiste à mieux comprendre les déterminants sociaux et culturels de l’usage des antibiotiques, y compris les croyances profondément ancrées, la culture et les habitudes qui sous-tendent les tendances en matière d’ordonnance des antibiotiques et leur utilisation. 

    Cette séance offrira une occasion de mieux comprendre les raisons qui expliquent l’ordonnance, l’usage et le mauvais usage des antibiotiques, d’entendre les leçons tirées de diverses initiatives multisectorielles menées auprès des praticiens et du public.

    WHAT IS MEASURED MATTERS: DEVELOPING STRENGTHS-BASED, CULTURALLY RELEVANT WELLNESS INDICATORS

    présenté par : Institut canadien d'information sur la santé

    Answering the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #19 calls for the establishment of measurable goals to identify and close the gaps in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities, and to publish annual progress reports and assess long-term trends.

    Indigenous concepts of wellness are distinct from western notions of wellness, and are unique to each community’s respective worldview. Strengths-based wellness indicators that positively reflect values, culture, and aspirations, and that are developed and monitored with and/or by the community itself best support communities to measure what is important to them.

    Relevant and useful health information enhances communities’ ability to tell their own narrative of wellness, and to be able to direct programs and services specifically to their communities’ needs and priorities. 

    How do we, as Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, support and answer this call to action?  Let’s learn together from our unique panelists who have experience and different perspectives on strengths-based wellness indicators.

    PRÉSENTATIONS DE RÉSUMÉS ORAUX

    Les détails suivront.

    12 h 15 à 13 h     Déjeuner contacts

    13 h à 14 h     Présentations d'affiches - séance 2

    La séance spéciale d’affiches et de réseautage permettra aux présentateurs d’engager la conversation avec les délégués et de présenter dans un lieu plus dynamique. Moins structurée qu’un exposé oral et avec plus de temps de présentation, la séance d’affiches permettra aux délégués de créer des liens et d’échanger des idées novatrices tout en facilitant des discussions et des commentaires productifs.

    Les détails de présentations suivra.

    14 h à 15 h 30     Séances simultanées

    BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT: BRIDGING DISCIPLINES OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING

    The Public Health Agency of Canada released a report in 2017 discussing how the built environment can help create healthy lifestyles and ultimately improve health. Collaboration between public health and planning has great potential for developing healthy built environments (HBEs) that address the social determinants of health. A concerted, intersectoral and collaborative effort to integrate public health perspectives into planning and policy development can support the development of HBEs that not only foster more vibrant and liveable communities but can also facilitate health and resilience. This session will bring together a panel of speakers to address pathways, resources and tools for better integration of health into planning and influencing public policies that shape the built environment. Panelists will share examples of collaborations between public health and planning sectors, lessons learned, and insights on strengthening the "evidence to practice" link to influence decisions. Participants will be able to identify actionable steps for fostering collaboration between public health and planning groups, and reflect about implementation opportunities in their respective context.

    ENGAGING STUDENTS AND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS: WHAT CAN PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS DO?

    This workshop will focus on what public health organizations can do to address the issue of a changing public health workforce and the engagement of students and young professionals (SYPs). Speaking from literature on trends in the public health workforce and the surveys and stakeholder engagements conducted by the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Student and Young Professional Working Group, this workshop will encourage participants to consider local application and implementation of the recommendations. 

    Based on a global survey completed with the aid of the World Federation of Public Health Associations’ Students and Young Professionals section, presenters will discuss tangible strategies for SYP engagement and metrics designed to assess the implementation of these recommendations by public health organizations. Participants will leave with an understanding of why SYP engagement is a critical issue, and specific programs and activities their organization can implement to engage SYPs.

    ENGAGING TENANT LEADERSHIP IN STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE RIGHT TO HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

    This symposium will explore strategies in research and practice to address housing as it intersects with other determinants of health, featuring ongoing work in Vancouver, BC, Ottawa, ON and Owen Sound, ON. Specifically, the session will explore community-based research approaches that support local intersectoral efforts, including the role of public health, in tackling housing inadequacy as a key driver of health inequities. 

    Participants will learn about research supporting tenant organizing strategies to address the inhabitable conditions of single room occupancy hotels in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, intersectoral research on the role and future of rooming houses in Ottawa, the RentSafe research initiative with public health and multiple other sectors on housing habitability in rural-based Owen Sound, and a novel Indigenous-led intersectoral table on homelessness in Owen Sound. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the emergent concept of Equity-focused Intersectoral Practice (EquIP) and how it can be used to promote meaningful intersectoral work to address systemic gaps and barriers. 

    FRONT-OF-PACKAGE NUTRITION LABELS: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE TO GUIDE NATIONAL AND GLOBAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT 

    The symposium will provide an overview of FOP labelling and summarize findings from three studies investigating the impact of FOP nutrition labelling systems. The studies presented in this symposium use innovative research designs (both Canadian and international) to assess consumer understanding and purchasing behaviours in response to different FOP labelling systems. All studies compared different FOP label designs to explore differences between Canada’s proposed ‘high in’ system and other common FOP label formats used internationally. 

    Participants will gain an understanding of the status of FOP regulations in Canada and internationally, and will become familiar with different experimental methods that can be used to assess FOP labels and other nutrition policies. The session will also provide a context for discussion of the potential benefits, weaknesses and policy implications of the many different FOP nutrition labelling formats.

    Monitoring the Sustainable Development Goals: Ensuring Equity in the Region of the Americas

    présenté par : Pan American Health Organization

    In this session, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) will present its corporate framework for the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030) in Latin America and the Caribbean. This framework is unique in that it incorporates the centrality of equity as part of its monitoring and analysis, which is a core principle of PAHO, to ensure no one is left behind in the Region. The framework is linked with the Sustainable Health Agenda for the Americas and PAHO's Strategic Plan, and builds accountability measures into country commitments. Presenters will discuss the development of the corporate framework, its application at the country level, country experience with inequalities monitoring, and information requirements.

    PREVENTING SUICIDE AMONG OLDER ADULTS:  RESPONDING TO A GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE

    Suicide is a global cause of preventable mortality, claiming over 800,000 lives annually (WHO, 2014).  Older adults have high rates of suicide, and the older adult population is expanding rapidly. Relatively little research evidence exists regarding later-life suicide risk detection and prevention, and even promising interventions are rarely offered to at-risk individuals (Heisel & Duberstein, 2016). Systemic factors contribute to this problem, including increasing pressure on an already-strained public healthcare system and a relative paucity of providers trained in aging and mental health. This symposium will focus on suicide prevention in later life, sharing mental health, public health, and social justice perspectives.  

    Participants will benefit from a review of the epidemiology of later-life suicide, risk and resiliency indicators, evidence-based and promising approaches to suicide risk detection and intervention, and interactive discussion on healthcare challenges, opportunities, and the need for novel public health solutions to this growing problem.

    RELATIONAL APPROACH IN DEVELOPING HEALTH AND WELLNESS STRATEGIES FOR METIS CITIZENS

    présenté par : Ralliement national des Métis

    The history of Canada has been greatly influenced by the Métis people who emerged in the west central North America with their own unique languages, common culture, traditions, and Métis Nation government structures. In 2018, Canada and the Métis Nation signed a framework agreement to begin the dialogue towards reconciliation through regionally tailored exploratory discussions and/or negotiations based upon a nation-to-nation, government-to-government relationship and approach.

    Metis Nation Saskatchewan recognizes the need for enhanced communication and collaborative partnerships to ensure the most effective mechanisms for the development of health and wellness services, culturally responsive programs and policies for Métis citizens are being considered with other community stakeholders

    This session will feature a historical presentation on the Métis Nation and the many contributions that helped shape Canada. Presenters will explore how to advance Metis Nation health priorities and how partnerships can collaborate to achieve better health outcomes.

    TACKLING INEQUITIES IN HEALTH CARE: THE HEIA TOOL

    The Ontario Government has identified health equity as a key component of health care. As a result, identifying and responding to health inequities has become a growing concern for organizations across the province. 

    But how do we tackle this concern? Ontario’s Health Equity Impact Assessment, or HEIA, is a key tool. 

    HEIA guides organizations in identifying and preventing the unintended health inequities that may result from a policy, program or service that might have an impact on people’s health. 

    HEIA can help:

    • Build health equity into an organization’s decision-making process;
    • Raise awareness about health equity in an organization;
    • Spot the unintended effects of a policy or program on the health of vulnerable or marginalized groups; and
    • Improve the design of policies or programs to increase the positive, and reduce the negative, health equity impacts.

    Our HEIA training explores key concepts related to health equity and goes on to examine the HEIA tool in detail. Participants will think about how the HEIA tool can be applied to their own practice and follow a series of guided steps to plan for their own HEIA.

    15 h 30 à 15 h 45     Pause

    15 h 45 à 17 h 15     Séances simultanées

    BECOME A DATA EXPLORER - UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN SUBSTANCE USE COSTS AND HARMS USING DATA VISUALIZATION

    This workshop will provide an overview of the methods and key provincial and territorial findings from the recent study of Canadian substance use costs and harms. Following this, facilitators will demonstrate the functionality of a complementary online data visualization tool. This will include explanations of the different study measures (e.g., counts, rates, costs); outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations, deaths, policing); and variables (e.g., substance, sex, age, year) that can be examined. It will also include a demonstration on generating various types of figures (e.g., plots, tables, maps). 

    Participants will be asked to develop a professionally relevant query that can be answered with the data. Then, with the help of a facilitator, they will generate the desired data visualizations. Through attending this workshop, participants will gain knowledge and understanding of this valuable resource that they can use to help answer research and policy questions, and to inform decision-making and other processes.

      CANADA's new FOOD GUIDE

      On January 22, 2019, Health Canada launched the new Food Guide, which transformed the way dietary guidance is communicated. This session will provide an overview of the approach to the revision of the Food Guide, the tools and resources released in early 2019, and next steps. This session will also provide an opportunity for participants to ask questions and seek clarification to support their understanding and use of the Guidelines and various tools and resources.

      EDUCATION FOR RECONCILIATION: DECOLONIZED AND ENGAGED PEDAGOGY - AN EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING EXERCISE TO TRANSFORM EMPATHY INTO SOCIAL ACTION

      This workshop is an experiential-based learning exercise created by Indigenous scholar, teacher and researcher Dr. Jennifer Leason. It was created as a call to action to transform participants’ understanding about the impacts of colonization on Indigenous peoples in Canada. The exercise is centred on reconciliation, decolonization and Indigenization.

      Reconciliation
      The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action (2015) aim to ensure all sectors:

      • Build student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect (p. 7, #62–63 iii), and
      • Offer skills-based training in intercultural competence training, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism (p. 3, #24).

      Decolonized and Engaged Pedagogy
      Decolonization and engaged pedagogy aims to transform consciousness through a paradigm shift from a culture of denial towards making space for Indigenous political philosophies, ways of knowing, being and doing.

      Indigenization Through Indigenous Pedagogy
      Indigenous pedagogy is inclusive, holistic and reflective of Indigenous ways of teaching and learning. The Talking Circle is utilized as pedagogy to create a safe space, where each one is equal and each one belongs. Participants in a Talking Circle learn to listen and respect others, as well as taking turns sharing their thoughts, ideas, emotions and experiences. Indigenous pedagogy engages teaching/learning practices that connect the head, heart, and spirit to “transform people in powerful ways that may not be fully understood on a rational level alone” (Paulette Regan, 2010, p. 205). The transformation is to move beyond the mere description and theorizing about the impacts of colonization, towards the experience and transformation of understanding towards empathy and social action.

      THE FUTURE OF THE MICROBIOME IN PUBLIC HEALTH

      Research into the human microbiome is evolving at a rapid pace, disrupting our established understanding of healthy development and aging. Concurrently, the public has been demonstrating a burgeoning interest in the microbiome and how it can support health while at the same time adopting new behaviours and practices that are impacting the microbiome in ways that could have negative-long term health consequences. What does the current state of the science tell us about the individual and community microbiome, and how can that drive improvements to public health? Through this interactive session, global leaders in microbiome research will engage with participants to explore how the human microbiome shapes health and disease across the lifespan, the implications of shifting societal and cultural practices on the microbiome, and how the emerging evidence in these areas may inform the development of key public health programs, practices and policies. 

      HOW TO DEVELOP A SUBMISSION TO PROFILE YOUR PUBLIC HEALTH INNOVATION IN POLICY OR PRACTICE IN THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

      Local public health providers are continually facing new challenges and coming up with promising approaches to deal with these challenges as part of their jobs. When these evidence-informed innovations are effective, other public health providers want to know about them and determine if similar approaches might be effective for their locale in a timely manner. The CJPH has developed a journal section to promote the dissemination of evidence-based innovations in public health policy and practice that have been evaluated and shown promise, but may not conform to a standard research article format. 

      In this workshop, organized and led by the Editor-in-Chief and a senior editor of the Canadian Journal of Public Health, participants will learn about this section of the Journal, the types of innovations that have been published to date, and learn the fundamentals of submitting an abstract and article for this section.
      Participants will engage in a facilitated exercise and discussion to determine the types of program and policy innovations that would be of interest to the journal, and how to write this idea as an abstract to submit to the Journal.

      NCCPH Knowledge Translation Graduate Student Awards: Panel Presentation 

      présenté par : Centres de collaboration nationale en santé publique

      The six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health (NCCPH) work together in knowledge translation (KT) to promote the use of research evidence and other knowledge to strengthen public health practices, programs and policies in Canada. Defined by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, knowledge translation is a dynamic and iterative process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and the ethically sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the health care system.

      Every year, as part of the NCCPH’s commitment to develop expertise in future generation(s) of public health, the six NCCs collaborate on the NCCPH Knowledge Translation Graduate Student Awards. The awards are presented to three students at the annual Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) conference and celebrate the experience and incentive of public health students to learn and acquire new knowledge translation skills. This panel session will highlight the graduate student knowledge translation projects awarded at Public Health 2019. The three students will present their award-winning topics and KT approaches, and engage with the audience in a question-and-answer period.

      PARTNERSHIPS FOR RACIAL EQUITY IN HEALTH

      This workshop, offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), will continue the dynamic conversation from the plenary on Racism in Society at Public Health 2017, by motivating delegates to remain engaged in anti-racism dialogue and action. Specifically, this workshop will allow delegates to increase their own level of understanding of racism and to move towards a culture of racial equity in order to build and maintain partnerships that will have a powerful impact on racialized health inequities. Using a combination of presentations, self-reflective exercises, and group work, the anticipated outcome of the workshop is to have participants return to their workplaces with key strategies, tools, and promising practices to advance racial equity through partnerships and effective engagement to create systems change.

      RECOVER: A SOCIAL INNOVATION APPROACH FOR URBAN WELLNESS AND SDOH

      RECOVER is a collective approach to figure out solutions that work for all and improve "urban wellness” in Edmonton’s downtown core neighbourhoods. RECOVER is using social innovation to explore ideas that achieve urban wellness, a complex challenge influenced by a myriad of determinants of health. Working with and listening deeply to communities, businesses, agencies, governments, and residents, RECOVER generated ideas or prototypes that were grounded in ethnographic research and other quantitative data. RECOVER tested 13 of these prototypes in the field that involved over 70 people from diverse sectors who brought them to life over a short (8-week) period. The continual learning from prototyping and the process offered insights for scaling up. 

      In this workshop, participants will use hands-on exercises to apply the tools we used in RECOVER, and vignettes to share learnings from our journey. The participants will walk away with concrete tools to cultivate innovative solutions for urban wellness in their municipalities.

      YOU COMPLETED A PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM: WHAT NOW? 

      The field of public health is vast and new professionals can find themselves working in a diverse number of areas.  Graduates from a public health program find work in the public, private, not-for-profit or academic sectors across a wide number of public health disciplines. Often time, a graduate may find themselves as the sole or one of few public health professionals in a workplace. As a result, it can be difficult for an early career professional to remain actively connected to the public health community as they transition out of the academic environment and into the workforce. 

      This workshop will provide early (and-soon-to-be) career professionals and students with the opportunity to participate in an interactive “speed-dating” activity and two moderated sessions focused on navigating the diverse public health workforce and a CV/resume development. Following this workshop attendees will be able to: identify techniques to optimize the academic to workforce transition, identify opportunities for connectivity and engagement with the public health community in Canada, apply CV/resume building pointers and improve networking skills. 
       

      jeudi 2 mai

      8 h 30 à 10 h 15     Plénière III

      UNE SANTÉ PUBLIQUE DE PRÉCISION?

      Les détails suivront.

      10 h 15 - 10 h 45     Pause-rafraîchissement

      10 h 45 à 12 h 15     Séances simultanées

      DEBUNKING “RACE”: CONTEXTUALIZING RACIAL HEALTH INEQUALITIES

      Measuring health care inequalities is a key step in identifying differences in access, care quality, and health care outcomes that may be considered unfair and can be acted on to improve health equity in Canada. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), along with experts from across Canada, are developing standard equity stratifier (socio-demographic variable) definitions to harmonize and inform the measurement of health inequalities. There is growing interest in Canada to monitor racial and ethnic inequalities in various sectors, such as health, justice and labour. In the health sector, careful consideration is necessary for the interpretation of racial and ethnic health inequalities to ensure that data are not used in a way that perpetuates racism. This symposium will focus on key learnings from CIHI’s engagement with health care researchers, health organizations, clinicians, and government stakeholders, among others, in the fields of racial health inequality measurement, racism and health care.   

      During this symposium, participants will learn and participate in discussions on:

      • The conflation of “race” and ethnicity
      • Pathways linking racism and health
      • Using “race”-based data to address and eliminate racial health inequalities in health care

      PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SYSTEM RENEWAL

      présenté par : Association canadienne de santé publique

      Over the last several years provincial and territorial governments have made significant adjustments to the ways in which they deliver health services, including public health. The resulting changes have raised concerns that these systems will no longer be able to meet the current mandate or address future concerns regarding public health service delivery. The Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) ‒ with the assistance of an expert advisory panel of senior public health professionals, CPHA’s Public Policy Committee and Board of Directors, and an electronic membership consultation ‒ has developed a discussion paper that explores the fundamentals of public health governance in Canada, and a position statement describing the Association’s perspective on the future of public health service delivery.   

      The purpose of this workshop is to review the recommendations presented in the position statement and to seek members’ viewpoints on how to develop and implement advocacy concerning the future direction of public health delivery in Canada.

      TRANSFORMING PUBLIC HEALTH KNOWLEDGE INTO ACTION FOR FIRST NATIONS 

      présenté par : Assemblée des Premières Nations

      Public health frameworks, strategies and models guide interventions and policies to promote health and reduce health disparities. First Nations' contributions to the scope and methodologies of evidence mobilizing and the formulation of public health interventions can strengthen uptake and relevance. 

      This collaborator session will emphasize public health agendas developed by First Nations that stimulate approaches that are established on strengths-based Indigenous methodologies, governance and knowledge systems.

      PRÉSENTATIONS DE RÉSUMÉS ORAUX

      Les détails suivront.


      12 h 15 - 13 h      Déjeuner contacts

      13 h à 14 h 30     Séances simultanées

      ADVANCING INDIGENOUS EQUITY IN HEALTH CARE USING STORYTELLING AND ROLE PLAY

      This workshop uses storytelling to demonstrate the gaps in knowledge and practice that compromise culturally safe, quality health care for Indigenous patients, families and communities. The exercises will demonstrate strategies to address these gaps through experiential learning activities that build concrete skills. The aim of this workshop is to improve understanding of the complexity of Indigenous determinants of health, and to share strategies on how to effectively engage and build capacity among health professionals and trainees.

      This workshop will provide experiential learning opportunities for health educators and practitioners to improve their ability to offer culturally safe care for Indigenous people. In addition, the workshop will support participants to develop theatre-based training activities in their own health service settings. The presenters will illustrate a range of challenges facing Indigenous people, both within the health care system and in the social determinants of health. Narratives will be presented, drawing on examples from Indigenous health experiences that demonstrate the challenges Indigenous people face.

      Participants will work in teams to explore the issues in the cases, reflecting on Indigenous determinants of health. Participants will construct and present a theatrical sketch that rewrites the scenario in line with a culturally safe approach. The workshop facilitators will then guide a reflection on the process and explore ways participants can apply this approach to their own settings.

      ALIGNING TWO WORLDS: WHAT CAN AMR SURVEILLANCE DO FOR PUBLIC HEALTH?

      This symposium will begin with a brief review of the Federal Framework and Action Plan and the Pan-Canadian Framework for Action. The session will then move to describe surveillance systems and datasets that provide a picture of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Canada, particularly between acute- and community-care settings. Finally, the session will summarize new resources and products designed to help public health stakeholders make better use of the data for planning and responses. 

      Providing the context for new developments in the fight against AMR, including surveillance, can help to inform delegates of the shared and crucial responsibility of all stakeholders to reduce AMR. More importantly, the symposium will provide valuable information on how to find and use AMR data for day-to-day research or public health decision-making and policy.  

      ANALYTICAL INNOVATION IN PUBLIC HEALTH EVIDENCE AND PRACTICE: INTEGRATING SEX, GENDER, KEY IDENTITY FACTORS AND SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

      Health inequities between and among men, women, girls, boys and gender-diverse populations have been increasingly recognized. Efforts to address these inequities to improve public health practice and action are increasingly informed by awareness of the social determinants of health and how these intersect to unequally affect health outcomes. Advancements in data and analytical tools can strengthen evidence-based interventions that are better tailored to the needs and circumstances of diverse groups of the population, and that have greater potential impact.

      Making the linkages between the social determinants of health approach and rigorous application of sex and gender considerations in policy, program and research, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and other health promotion partners have strengthened evidence, interventions and programs to reduce health inequities in Canada. 

      BUILDING EVIDENCE-BASED COMMUNITY GUIDELINES TO END HOMELESSNESS USING MULTI-STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

      Individuals who face homelessness or who are vulnerably housed have higher risks of poor health and social outcomes. Limited access to basic social supports, stigma that both affects homeless persons and may marginalize their practitioners, and mental illness are key priorities for evidence-based community guidelines. 

      Our project aims to assess the effectiveness of a broad range of interventions for homeless and vulnerably-housed individuals. Facilitators reviewed the literature on experiences of homeless individuals that engage with services; by partnering with primary care, public health, community organizations and youth advocates, we have drafted recommendations to improve the care and health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. 

      A panel of primary care researchers and individuals with lived experience of homelessness will present on current knowledge synthesis and mobilization strategies being used to improve health and social outcomes. Delegates will be able to use this information to inform program design and implementation, and act on identified research gaps.

      CHEERS AND FEARS OF VAPING E-CIGARETTES: CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE 

      To answer the three questions, speakers will present findings from systematic literature reviews, select published studies, and four of their Canadian studies:  1) Cohort Study of 1,040 youth, 60% of whom are regular vapers; 2) Concept Mapping study on the experiences smokers have when trying to quit smoking by vaping; 3) 14 Focus Groups – half with youth vapers and non-vapers, and half with adults; and 4) Point-of-Sale study in 50 stores in five cities. The manager of a large Tobacco Control Area Network will present on the implications of findings for public health action and on a comprehensive strategy for reducing potential harms while realizing any potential benefits. Participants will be engaged in small-group work sessions in which they will be asked to draw out implications of what they have heard for policy development and programmatic intervention at local, provincial and federal levels.  

      MEASURING HEALTH INEQUALITIES: APPLYING A TOOLKIT DEVELOPED BY THE CANADIAN INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION

      Health equity is a growing priority for healthcare systems in Canada; however, there is limited routine measurement and reporting of inequalities in health care access, quality and outcomes. This workshop will provide participants with an overview of a toolkit developed by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) to assist analysts and researchers with measuring and reporting on health inequalities. Launched in October 2018, this toolkit is organized in 3 phases: planning your analysis, analyzing your data and reporting your findings. In this session, participants will learn how to use standard equity stratifier definitions, identify available stratifiers in selected CIHI and Statistics Canada data, calculate stratified indicator rates and summary measures, and apply key guidelines for interpreting and reporting on health inequalities. Practical examples will be based on commonly used health indicators, and will draw on participants’ experience and areas of interest. This toolkit is available online. Participants can also access free eLearning courses that expand on the workshop content through CIHI’s Learning Centre.

      TAILORED TO FIT: MAKING ADAPTATIONS TO EVIDENCE-BASED PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS

      Adaptations to evidence-based public health programs are commonplace. These adaptations are primarily made to enhance the cultural relevance of the program, and can therefore improve uptake of the program. However, adaptations also tend to be reactive and disconnected from the theory and evidence base of the program, which threatens programs’ effectiveness. A practical method of adapting programs while considering their theory and evidence basis is required. 

      In this workshop, facilitators will describe when, why and how adaptations are made to public health programs. Practical implementation science frameworks will be discussed. Conference delegates will be engaged in two interactive activities: 1) identifying and unpacking different types of adaptations, and 2) using frameworks to plan adaptations so that the learnings can be directly applied to their own work. By the end of this workshop, delegates will have a sound understanding of how to consider program adaptations before and during implementation.

      VACCINATION IN PREGNANCY: TO VACCINATE OR NOT….THAT IS THE QUESTION!

      Vaccination during pregnancy offers a safe option that improves outcomes for mothers and babies, yet many pregnant women choose not to receive vaccinations. By understanding the factors that influence decisions and practices of women’s healthcare providers, improvements and changes to antenatal care provision can be recommended. Ultimately, changes in practice can have a long-term impact on the number of cases of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality related to vaccine-preventable illnesses during pregnancy, and this can be translated into potential cost savings to the healthcare system.  

      Symposium participants will gain insight into current practices of maternal healthcare providers and the barriers to optimizing immunization coverage during pregnancy. Participants will learn about strategies to mitigate the challenges and how they can receive training to feel confident and competent counselling about vaccination during pregnancy. They will receive specific guidance on the influenza and Tdap vaccines.

      14 h 30 à 16 h     Plénière IV

      LA FORCE DE LA COLLECTIVITÉ : CONNEXITÉ SOCIALE ET SANTÉ PUBLIQUE

      L’interprétation simultanée sera disponible pour cette séance.

      Nous sommes au beau milieu d’une épidémie d’isolement social. Certaines populations y sont plus vulnérables que d’autres, mais la solitude ne fait aucune discrimination et peut frapper partout. Divers facteurs sont associés à l’isolement social croissant : l’évolution des structures familiales, la mobilité sociale et professionnelle accrue, l’affaiblissement des institutions de proximité et le recours accru aux médias numériques. Il est démontré que la connexité sociale et la possibilité de s’impliquer concrètement dans son milieu protègent contre la solitude et les problèmes de santé et de bien-être qui y sont associés. Durant cette séance, nous explorerons les liens entre la solitude et le mieux-être, les déterminants sociaux de la santé et les tendances actuelles de la participation de proximité au Canada et nous réfléchirons aux moyens de favoriser et de créer des milieux de vie qui renforcent la connexité sociale.

      Orateur et oratrice :

      • John Helliwell, Senior Fellow, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
      • Kate Mulligan, Director of Policy and Communication, Alliance for Healthier Communities